Archive for the ‘practice’ category

February 3, 2012

What CQC outcomes say about Eating and nutritional careselection of fruit

The outcome that relates to eating and nutritional care is:

Outcome 5: Meeting nutritional needs – Requires services that provide food to ensure:

  • a choice of suitable and nutritious food and hydration, in sufficient quantities to meet people’s needs
  • food and hydration provision meets any reasonable requirements arising from a person’s religious or cultural background
  • support, where necessary, for the purposes of enabling people to eat and drink sufficient amounts for their needs.

Regulation 14 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008

So here are some interesting facts from the Social Care Institute for Excellence

Eating and nutritional care and dignity – key points from policy and research

  • Food, nutrition and mealtimes are a high priority for older people and a top priority for older people from black and minority ethnic groups (PRIAE/Help the Aged, 2001).
  • Malnutrition affects over 10 per cent of older people (British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 2006).
  • Between 19 and 30 per cent of all people admitted to hospitals, care homes or mental health units are at risk of malnutrition (British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 2007).
  • The UK Home Care Association estimates that up to 90,000 people who receive home care services could be at risk of malnutrition (Grove, 2008).
  • Public expenditure on disease-related malnutrition in the UK in 2007 has been estimated at in excess of £13 billion per annum (Elia.M, Russell, C.A. Combating Malnutrition – Recommendations for Action BAPEN 2009)
  • Malnourished patients stay in hospital longer, are three times as likely to develop complications during surgery, and have a higher mortality rate (Age Concern, 2006; BBC, 2006).
  • The needs of people from black and minority ethnic groups, including ‘basics such as food’ are not always met by mainstream services (PRIAE/Help the Aged, 2001; Afshar et al, 2002).
  • Key points in bringing about a culture change in food, nutrition and mealtimes are: good leadership, staff induction and training and adequate staffing levels (Commission for Social Care Inspection, 2006).
  • The NHS Standards for Better Health requires healthcare organisations to ensure that patients have a choice of food that is prepared safely and provides a balanced diet; and that ‘individual nutritional, personal and clinical dietary requirements are met, including any necessary help with feeding and access to food 24 hours a day’ (Department of Health, 2004e).
  • In February 2006 the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and the National Collaborating Centre for Acute Care launched clinical guidance to help the NHS identify patients who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition.
  • The NHS Essence of Care benchmarks for food and nutrition include attention to nutritional assessment, the environment, presentation of food and appropriate assistance (Department of Health, 2003c). These can be used by care homes, as well as healthcare providers, to benchmark services.

Hydration

  • The evidence suggests that good hydration can help prevent falls, constipation, pressure sores, kidney stones, blood pressure problems and headaches (Ellins, 2006).
  • Poor hydration has been shown to contribute to obesity, depression, inactivity and fatigue and to prolong healing and recovery (Ellins, 2006).
  • There is some evidence to suggest that dehydration can increase mortality in stroke patients and prolong hospital stays for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (Water UK, 2005).
  • For some older people the sensation of feeling thirsty may be impaired and may not be an accurate indicator for good hydration (Kenney et al, 2001; Caroline Walker Trust Expert Working Group on Nutritional Guidelines for Food Prepared for Older People, 2004) particularly for people who have had a stroke and those with dementia (Albert et al, 1994; Water UK, 2005).
  • Following a study of four care homes, Anglian Water has launched the Health on Tap campaign (Anglian Water, 2008) to improve hydration for older people in care homes. The key findings of the study were:
    • Availability, visibility and reminders were some of the key factors to drinking more water.
    • After a regime was introduced and a water cooler installed, anecdotal evidence from one home reported: a 50 per cent reduction in falls; a greater than 50 per cent reduction in the number of residents taking laxatives; and a decrease in GP call-outs and urinary infections.
    • There were language barriers for some staff, with 50 per cent not having English as a first language.
    • Hydration does not feature as a specific training topic in its own right.
    • Residents’ fear of increased toilet trips was the main barrier to drinking more water (the report states: ‘Once the bladder had adjusted and was able to hold more volume, toilet trips soon settled down to pre-trial levels.’)
    • Peer-to-peer learning, rather than formal training, plays a large role in the knowledge and working habits of staff.
    • Knowledgeable and committed managers generate positive results.
    • Visual and mental impairments were a problem for many residents, with a high dependency on care staff to instigate water intake.
    • Staff said they would like promotional materials for themselves, residents and their families, to remind them of the importance of hydration.
    • The ability to spread and share good practice was seen as very important
      (Anglian Water, 2008).
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How to Build Rapport with anyone Instantly!

April 1, 2008


Rapport It’s my experience that people do business with people that they know, like and trust. If you could build stronger relationships with your potential clients faster –would that be of value to you and to your business?

Yes? Then read on.

People like people who are like themselves or who they aspire to become.

Have you ever met a perfect stranger and yet felt instantly comfortable with them? As if you’ve know them for ages.

Have you ever though, met someone for the 1st time and instantly disliked them or felt uncomfortable with them for no apparent reason?

Lots of sales people will say to me …well I’m already pretty good at rapport, I get on with most people….there’s always going to be a few that you don’t hit it off with.

I want to show you how you can get on with anyone, quickly and effectively so that you can do business with them. Even with the ones you wouldn’t normally hit it off with. This is important because they are the extra sales for your business and will give you the edge over the competition.

What is Rapport?

Rapport is that feeling of being comfortable with someone and trusting them.

A crucial component in any interaction particularly a sales interaction. It’s the first thing we need to establish and the most important thing to keep all the way through the presentation to the client.

We often don’t know WHY we like or dislike someone which makes me ask the question then “Where does rapport take place?”

In our minds we have two components – The conscious mind and the unconscious mind. The conscious mind likes to think it is in control. It’s the logical mind, the rational mind, the goal setting mind.

However, the unconscious mind is that part of us that runs the body. It’s the part that stays awake when we’re asleep, listening for the alarm clock. It’s the part that keeps us breathing without thinking about it, it keeps our heart beating and our spleen, dare I say it, spleening!

The conscious mind may set the goals but the unconscious mind is the part that gets the goals. It filters out irrelevant information and makes you take notice of the things you need to look out for, opportunities to meet your goal.

Rapport happens at the level of the unconscious mind so how can we use it consciously to help us build strong relationships quickly and easily?

How do you get into rapport with someone?

How To Get In Rapport

Start with the chit chat – Look for common interests, hobbies, acquaintances, places you have been to, styles of clothing you might like etc. Find some things in common by having a little chat before the sales process begins. You are looking to put them at ease and enjoy having you there.

In order to have this conversation and find the common experiences we have to exchange words AND you need to have good listening skills to notice what information they are giving so that you can use to good effect. You need to be ACTIVELY listening – all too often we’re so busy thinking about what we want to say next that we are not concentrating on what the other person is saying. Key point – be present with your client at all times.

Notice also the language that people use when they talk.

Now obviously I don’t mean are they speaking English or Portuguese here! I mean how do they choose to internally represent the world outside?

People tend to have what is called a dominant or preferred thinking style.

People prefer to communicate in one of three ways:-

Visual

Auditory

Kinaesthetic

We all use all three – we just have one that we prefer to use one more than the others.

What to look for……

If someone likes to communicate using their auditory senses they might use phrases such as

“I hear what you’re saying”

“That rings a bell”

“Tell me more”

If someone likes to communicate using their visual senses they might use phrases such as

“I get the picture”

“I see what you mean”

“Can you imagine that?”

If someone likes to communicate using their kinaesthetic senses they might use phrases such as

“I get the feeling that…”

“I need concrete evidence”

“Give me hard facts”

If you are talking to a client and you just don’t seem to be getting the connection or the understanding that you need – stop and ask yourself – how am I different to them?

It may be that you are speaking a “foreign” language perhaps by noticing their preferred style of communication and adjusting yours to match you’ll achieve rapport.

It’s Not Just The Words You Use

Studies have shown that only 7% of what is communicated between people is transmitted through the words themselves.

38% comes through the tone of the voice, the tempo, the volume and the timbre – or individual characteristics of the voice and

55% of communication, by far the largest part is a result of physiology or body language.

Let’s first understand what is meant by the characteristics of the voice.

You could mirror the tonality and phrasing, the pitch, the speed, volume, tempo – what sort of pauses does that person make?

What about the BIG bit though?

Body language or physiology – one of the fastest ways to build rapport with another person is to mirror and match their body language.

What aspects of another person’s body language could we mirror or match?

The facial expressions,

The gestures,

The quality and type of movements,

Mirror or copy posture….do they stand or sit up straight or are they slouched? Do they have their legs crossed or not? Do they have there hands in their lap or their arms folded or resting their hand on their chin?

Do they make lots of eye contact? What are their facial expressions….if they are looking sad – you wouldn’t want to be sitting there with a big grin on your face!

How do they breathe………long deep breaths, short shallow breaths?

Do they tilt their head to one side……you can mirror all of these things.

Obviously you might want to be a little subtle at times, mirroring and matching some part of their physiology not copying every posture and move – if they notice you’ve blown it! So use it wisely.

Combine that with matching the words or language that they use and you will have them as your friend in no time because whilst the words are working on the persons conscious mind, the physiology is working on the unconscious minds and the brain starts to think WOW! They’re like me!

Practice it, master it and watch your business grow!!

Watch for my next article – I Am In Rapport, Now What? Eliciting Buying Strategies.

For further information on this subject and to discover how coaching and training n this subject can help you and your business grow contact Tracey Dowe at Momentum People Ltd

Email tracey.dowe@momentumpeople.co.uk

www.momentumpeople.co.uk

tel: 01793 700929

Visualisation – Your Amazing Mind!

February 19, 2008


j0433055.jpg Your mind is an amazing, powerful and creative tool. With it you have an awesome capacity to change how you feel long-term by creating your future right now.

If you can imagine it, you can achieve it. If you can dream it, you can become it. – William A. Ward

You not only have the ability to remember events and re-run them in your mind, but you are also capable of creating events or feelings in your imagination before they actually occur. You do this all the time; when you are looking forward to a holiday you have booked or when you have planned a night out. You think about how it’s going to be and build up an expectation of how it will play out don’t you?

Athletes use this ability to practice their techniques and to run the races before they have even stepped out of the starting blocks. Golfers use it to practice their swing, musicians use it to practice their performances before the big day. The incredible thing is — and I love this – the mind can’t tell the difference between what is real and what is imagined visually.

Wow! How cool is that?! If you imagine your future vividly – it becomes your reality.

So if you want to feel fantastic, have tons of energy, be happy, successful and abundant in every good way, the secret is to start that process right now in your imagination. How?

Everyday set aside ten minutes each morning and ten minutes every night to do this. Sit quietly, close your eyes and let the process begin.

In your imagination see yourself as the person you would LOVE to become. Where are you? Who are you with? What are you doing? How does it feel? Breathe deeply and soak it all in. Now make the picture brighter, add more colour to it. What are you saying to yourself or others around you? Make the feelings stronger, feel the emotions you’re feeling more intensely. Smile as you see yourself being amazing, as you feel an incredible inner strength, joy and confidence! Now turn the sound up. Make the vision even more real!

As you experience the joy and passion of who you are, give thanks for it as if it has already happened, as if it is happening right now in this very moment. Celebrate the new you! Celebrate the moment and make it real. Do this over and over again, for all the ways you want to change, for all the new things you want to do, for all the new, powerful feelings you want to experience. Live the life you deserve the way you want to NOW and you will be well on your way to making it your reality!

 

To find out more about your amazing mind contact tracey.dowe@momentumpeople.co.uk or log in to http://www.momentumpeople.co.uk